Whole Food Plant-Based Diet - Home

Whole Food Plant-Based Diet - Home

Whole Food Plant-Based Diet - Home

Whole Food Plant-Based Diet - Home

Whole Food Plant-Based Diet - Home
Whole Food Plant-Based Diet - Home

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Whole Food Plant-Based Diet
Whole Food Plant-Based Diet
Whole Food Plant-Based Diet

Research suggests that people who eat a whole food plant-based (WFPB) diet tend to be healthier. Let’s get a better understanding of this diet by breaking it down into two terms:

 

“whole food” and “plant-based”.

 

Firstly, whole food refers to food that has undergone minimal processing and refinement. However, instead of categorizing food as either “whole” or “processed”, we should consider food as existing on a continuum. An example of a food closer to the “whole” end would be steamed patotoes, while potato chips would fall closer to the “processed” end. The latter would contain additives for flavoring and additives such as salt and preservatives, may not be very healthy.

 

Apart from adding ingredients, another method of processing food is to split a food into different components. This often results in the loss of desirable nutrients due to the process or the fact that some nutrients are only found in a particular component of a food. For example, many of the nutrients in soybeans are not found in soybean oil, which is extracted from soybeans. As we are aiming to eat whole foods, you will see that the recipes in this cookbook minimize the use of heavily refined or processed ingredients.

 

As for the term “plant-based”, it generally refers to food that comes from plant sources. However, this term can be interpreted in a number of ways. For some, it means that their diet will contain no food of animal origin. This means that they will not consume eggs, dairy and honey, but mushrooms – which are neither animals nor plants – are fine.

 

[Source: Tempted by Tempeh by Dr Susianto Tseng & Dr George Jacobs. Image by Grosskev from Pixabay.]

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